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Thread: Scaly Face

  1. #1 Scaly Face 
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    i cannot understand people buying budgerigars with scaly face,but you are,you are bringing this contagious disease into your home,all your cage and contents,the areas in which your bird has regular contact are now affected,your hand,sleeve,your furniture are all contaminated.i would sue any budgerigar outlet be it a private breeder or a national chain if they contaminated my stud.
    examine any bird you propose to buy,if it was a car i bet you would.
    treat any infected bird with ivormectin,one drop per bird on the neck will kill all mites and parasites.

  2. #2  
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    hi barrie

    where can you buy ivormectin

    pete
    Pete Young BS(Y424),SBS(SY65)

    started to revamp website,have a look
    www.freewebs.com/pdy-budgies

  3. #3  
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    hampshire breeders about £13.95 which includes carraige,dose adults yearly and chicks in the nest.
    phone 01730 301340.

  4. #4  
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    thanks barrie,better be safe than sorry as they say
    Pete Young BS(Y424),SBS(SY65)

    started to revamp website,have a look
    www.freewebs.com/pdy-budgies

  5. #5  
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    Scaly Face and Scaly Leg Mite Infestations in Aviary Birds Disclaimer
    Dr Cam Day
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Scaly Face is caused by a mite known as either the Scaly Face Mite or the Scaly Leg Mite. In canaries the same mite causes a condition commonly called 'Tassle Foot'. The mite’s scientific name is Cnemidocoptes. Being an arachnid, it is an eight-legged beastie and is the smaller cousin of the spider, the tick and the scorpion. It burrows under the scales of the legs and into the keratin of the bird’s beak. However, it can also be found around the vent of birds and on their wing tips.

    What will I see if my bird is affected with Scaly Face and Scaly Leg?
    What will my vet do to treat the disease?
    Controlling Scaly Face and Leg Mite


    What will I see if my bird is affected with Scaly Face and Scaly Leg? Top
    When the mite infects budgerigars, the beak will look white, chalky and crusty and will have a honeycomb appearance. The crustiness can spread around the bird’s cere (the lump at the base of the beak) and eyes. The crusty, scaley appearance also appears on the legs and sometimes around the vent.

    If the problem is left untreated, the infection in the growing portion of the beak can cause the beak to become permanently deformed.

    Canaries generally show a different appearance. Their legs develop thickened areas that look more like corns.


    What will my vet do to treat the disease? Top
    Your veterinarian will probably confirm the infection by doing a scraping of the affected areas. This is easily done and if the mites are present, they are quite visible under a microscope. Ask your vet for a peek down the microscope as the mites are fascinating critters. They look much like a cross between ET on a bad hair day and a miniature mud crab with attitude!

    The most effective treatments for Scaly Face or Leg mite infestations are Avomectin, Ivermectin or Moxidectin which can only be prescribed by your veterinary surgeon.

    In the past many other treatments have ben used but are less effective. Most of these preparations are a mixture of benzyl benzoate and paraffin oil. One recommendation is to use such a product daily for three days, and repeat this three times with two weeks between each treatment.

    Bird fanciers often treat the condition by rubbing petroleum jelly or paraffin oil on the beak, the cere, and the legs of the budgerigars on a daily basis. While this does not directly kill the mite, it is thought that it causes them to suffocate.

    Paraffin oil will also help to soften the crusts and to remove them from a bird’s face and legs. In addition, the preparations should be placed around the vent and on the wing tips of each bird as the mites sometimes hide in these areas. While this is a time-honoured technique, it is falling into disfavour because it is easy to get the oil onto a bird’s feathers.

    The oil is very difficult to remove, and sometime the only method is to wait until new feathers replace the oiled ones.

    If you are putting any oily preparation onto the beak be careful that your bird does not swallow or inhale any of it. Use a cotton bud to ensure the oil is placed accurately.

    Should a bird’s beak be growing abnormally from damage the mites have caused to the cere, trimming of the beak regularly may be needed. This needs to be done carefully as any incorrect trimming could be disastrous. Play it safe and let your veterinarian do this.


    Controlling Scaly Face and Leg Mite Top
    The big problem with Scaly Face is not how to treat an individual bird. The concern is how to stop the problem from affecting other ‘in contact’ birds. Scaly Face is quite contagious and if left untreated, other birds will succumb to the disease. In addition, because the infection only becomes obvious after six to twelve months, it can have quite a toe-hold on a flock of birds before the problem becomes obvious.

    The mite spends its whole life cycle on the bird thus it appears to be transmitted between birds by direct contact. It is also likely that some birds are genetically more susceptible to the mite than others. It also seems able to burrow into wooden perches in the cage. Therefore, you should replace perches in an infected cage weekly, using branches from native trees.

    Ivermectin can also be used to control Scaly Face in an aviary of birds. Your veterinarian will advise you further on its use and on other procedures to control the problem.

    Be sure to be on the lookout for Scale Face or your beleaguered budgie may never want to show it beak in public again!



    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~
    Dr Cam Day BVSc BSc MACVSc is a veterinary surgeon, an animal behaviour consultant and media presenter. In 1995 he qualified as a Member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in the discipline of Animal Behaviour and is one of only 15 veterinarians with this qualification in Australia. He works full time in animal behaviour management in Queensland, consulting with dog, cat and bird owners on a daily basis as well as appearing on air as Brisbane’s radio Pet Vet, and writing for various magazines.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~

  6. #6  
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    great information
    i was wandering how often should you clean the cage and with what

  7. #7  
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    Just popped into a pet shop while passing Barrie, and i've just come across scaley face first hand. I must admit i wasn't expecting something so drastic. The poor birds beak was all deformed and its eyes were nearly shut, but it didn't really look an old bird. The best thing was there were about another 15 birds in the cage, and they were all young fit healthy birds.
    I said you might want too quarantine that mate, and after a few hums and hahs he said i'll get it out and put some cream on it?
    Really if i'd had the money i would have bought it just to put it out of its misery. Not a nice thing to say, but the poor bird looked tortured.

  8. #8  
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    clean out the cages with vanodine or virkon s available from good pet stores.
    Last edited by Barrie Shutt; 24-05-2007 at 12:25 PM.

  9. #9  
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    thanx
    i'll get some

  10. #10  
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    My budgie had something wrong with him. There was a spot of dry scaley skin by his eye and a scaley beak> I took him to my vet who thought it was scaley face and injected him with an antiparisitic medicine and asked me to bring him back. I did so and that time he'd bought that medicine you're talking about and he put a spot on his neck. He's been fine since and so has his friend.

  11. #11  
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    it in our hands we can eliminate scaly face.

  12. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by barrie shutt View Post
    Scaly Face and Scaly Leg Mite Infestations in Aviary Birds Disclaimer
    Dr Cam Day
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Scaly Face is caused by a mite known as either the Scaly Face Mite or the Scaly Leg Mite. In canaries the same mite causes a condition commonly called 'Tassle Foot'. The mite’s scientific name is Cnemidocoptes. Being an arachnid, it is an eight-legged beastie and is the smaller cousin of the spider, the tick and the scorpion. It burrows under the scales of the legs and into the keratin of the bird’s beak. However, it can also be found around the vent of birds and on their wing tips.

    What will I see if my bird is affected with Scaly Face and Scaly Leg?
    What will my vet do to treat the disease?
    Controlling Scaly Face and Leg Mite


    What will I see if my bird is affected with Scaly Face and Scaly Leg? Top
    When the mite infects budgerigars, the beak will look white, chalky and crusty and will have a honeycomb appearance. The crustiness can spread around the bird’s cere (the lump at the base of the beak) and eyes. The crusty, scaley appearance also appears on the legs and sometimes around the vent.

    If the problem is left untreated, the infection in the growing portion of the beak can cause the beak to become permanently deformed.

    Canaries generally show a different appearance. Their legs develop thickened areas that look more like corns.


    What will my vet do to treat the disease? Top
    Your veterinarian will probably confirm the infection by doing a scraping of the affected areas. This is easily done and if the mites are present, they are quite visible under a microscope. Ask your vet for a peek down the microscope as the mites are fascinating critters. They look much like a cross between ET on a bad hair day and a miniature mud crab with attitude!

    The most effective treatments for Scaly Face or Leg mite infestations are Avomectin, Ivermectin or Moxidectin which can only be prescribed by your veterinary surgeon.

    In the past many other treatments have ben used but are less effective. Most of these preparations are a mixture of benzyl benzoate and paraffin oil. One recommendation is to use such a product daily for three days, and repeat this three times with two weeks between each treatment.

    Bird fanciers often treat the condition by rubbing petroleum jelly or paraffin oil on the beak, the cere, and the legs of the budgerigars on a daily basis. While this does not directly kill the mite, it is thought that it causes them to suffocate.

    Paraffin oil will also help to soften the crusts and to remove them from a bird’s face and legs. In addition, the preparations should be placed around the vent and on the wing tips of each bird as the mites sometimes hide in these areas. While this is a time-honoured technique, it is falling into disfavour because it is easy to get the oil onto a bird’s feathers.

    The oil is very difficult to remove, and sometime the only method is to wait until new feathers replace the oiled ones.

    If you are putting any oily preparation onto the beak be careful that your bird does not swallow or inhale any of it. Use a cotton bud to ensure the oil is placed accurately.

    Should a bird’s beak be growing abnormally from damage the mites have caused to the cere, trimming of the beak regularly may be needed. This needs to be done carefully as any incorrect trimming could be disastrous. Play it safe and let your veterinarian do this.


    Controlling Scaly Face and Leg Mite Top
    The big problem with Scaly Face is not how to treat an individual bird. The concern is how to stop the problem from affecting other ‘in contact’ birds. Scaly Face is quite contagious and if left untreated, other birds will succumb to the disease. In addition, because the infection only becomes obvious after six to twelve months, it can have quite a toe-hold on a flock of birds before the problem becomes obvious.

    The mite spends its whole life cycle on the bird thus it appears to be transmitted between birds by direct contact. It is also likely that some birds are genetically more susceptible to the mite than others. It also seems able to burrow into wooden perches in the cage. Therefore, you should replace perches in an infected cage weekly, using branches from native trees.

    Ivermectin can also be used to control Scaly Face in an aviary of birds. Your veterinarian will advise you further on its use and on other procedures to control the problem.

    Be sure to be on the lookout for Scale Face or your beleaguered budgie may never want to show it beak in public again!



    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~
    Dr Cam Day BVSc BSc MACVSc is a veterinary surgeon, an animal behaviour consultant and media presenter. In 1995 he qualified as a Member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in the discipline of Animal Behaviour and is one of only 15 veterinarians with this qualification in Australia. He works full time in animal behaviour management in Queensland, consulting with dog, cat and bird owners on a daily basis as well as appearing on air as Brisbane’s radio Pet Vet, and writing for various magazines.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~
    indeed very informative, thanks!

  13. #13  
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    Just ordered the ivormectin from hampshire breeders and books,Barrie was right £13.95 including p+p

    Pete
    Pete Young BS(Y424),SBS(SY65)

    started to revamp website,have a look
    www.freewebs.com/pdy-budgies

  14. #14  
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    budgies that do have scaly face and have been treated, how long should you isolate them for? until it clears up completely?

  15. #15  
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    I Would Certainly Give Them Six Weeks Isolation

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